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Wed, Feb. 8th, 2006, 02:29 pm

Some material regarding last week's topic of Stringfellows. I have more but some licensing issues prevent me from reproducing them here so I'm looking elsewhere.



First off, some statistics dragged up from various papers and studies, none of which actually include any kind of link to their source or give any real hint as to where to find the damned thing so take these however you like.

From 1984 to 1989, more than 100 sexually oriented businesses were closed in Oklahoma County, Okla. During that same period, reports of rape decreased 26 percent, even as the rape rate increased 20 percent in the rest of the state.
In Cincinnati, major crimes such as rape and robbery dropped 83 percent in areas where illegal sex shops were shut down (Wombat Note: I honest to God don't get how robbery would decrease when a sex shop shut down...)
The number of sex crimes in Phoenix more than doubled in areas with sexually oriented businesses.
The Michigan State Police studied 38,000 sexual assault cases, and found that pornography was used in connection with rape in 41 percent of the cases. (Wombat Note: There's no explanation of what "used in connection" entails, though with a percentage as high as 41% I'd ASSUME it means the perpetrator was a habitual user)

Links:

The first two were the most interesting to me

P26, 37 and 54 onwards have the most relevance here. Its a study done for the Glasgow city council on the impact of the clubs and their behaviour. It focuses heavily on Spearming Rhino, a club like Stringfellows, or that at least makes the same claims regarding the safety and integrity of their club.
http://www.glasgow.gov.uk/NR/rdonlyres/AF8653FD-9FC4-4DE6-8238-CE629C7D6C3E/0/LapdancingReport.pdf
Its a long paper, so I'll sum up the main points I took from it - The majority of (an admittedly small) a sample group of dancers in even the most "upmarket" clubs had to deal with horrible behaviour from the customers and the women who worked/lived neaby were scared and intimidated by its very presence, never mind the behaviour of the patrons. The dancers themselves are often lied to regarding the doors that stripping opens, or are coerced into getting plastic surgery and made to feel like crap if even the smallest bit of cellulite is showing.

This one deals very much in American clubs but is quite indicative of the *attitude* towards strippers, if not the behaviour towards them. In a break from the norm, this one contains some statistics.
http://www.uri.edu/artsci/wms/hughes/stripc1.htm
This one focuses almost entirely on the dancers' experiences and once again is a relatively small sample group but gives some sort of idea of the caliber of the customers.




Anecdotal evidence and personal testimonies


A page devoted to former dancers and their experience. They have a tendency to thank Jesus for giving them the strength to get out of there but I'd like to think that their beliefs don't invalidate their message.
http://www.ex-dancers.com/reports.htm

A few statistics, not a great bibliography to it, so they're hard to verify.
http://cyber.law.harvard.edu/vaw02/From%20Comfort%20Women%20to%20loveme.htm

Since I mentioned her before - Annabel Chong
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sex:_The_Annabel_Chong_Story

The next few aren't *directly* related but cover the same theme of the cause/effect of violence.
The National Center for Injury Prevention and Control
http://www.cdc.gov/ncipc/default.htm

Some links regarding the international treatment and/or trafficing of women. Not directly linked to the discussion but they're good resources in general.
http://www.prostitutionresearch.com/
http://www.catwinternational.org/

Random links
http://www.mincava.umn.edu/documents/arpornography/arpornography.html
http://www.boundless.org/1999/features/a0000136.html
http://www.mwsexual.com/readingroom/articles/sexually-explicit.htm


Believe the statistics/stories or don't. I don't give a crap either way.



Edited to correct a few spelling mistakes and missing words. Stupid brain.

Wed, Feb. 8th, 2006 03:05 pm (UTC)
bastun_ie

...none of which actually include any kind of link to their source or give any real hint as to where to find the damned thing so take these however you like.

Which is, of course, the problem with statistics. In the Oklahoma stats, for instance - what else was having an impact (or not?). Things like police manpower and budgets, and priorities given to officers; availability and resourcing of support services for victims (which might encourage reporting); the economic health of the state; etc.

The Scottish report, by contrast, is far more convincing. Just my 2c.

Wed, Feb. 8th, 2006 03:30 pm (UTC)
mr_wombat

Yup, to be honest I've seen enough dishonesty or laziness in how statistics are generated that I'll nearly accept anecdotal evidence over them - provided of course the anedcotal evidence is gathered in an ethical manner (as outlined in the scottish report for example).
The first two I listed had the most impact for me, the statistics regarding customer behaviour, while unlikely to be reproduced here, were a strong indicator of how many men regard the clubs and dancers - a small minority I'm sure, but enough to leave those women loathing the male gender.

Sun, Feb. 12th, 2006 01:44 pm (UTC)
ocultado

In Cincinnati, major crimes such as rape and robbery dropped 83 percent in areas where illegal sex shops were shut down (Wombat Note: I honest to God don't get how robbery would decrease when a sex shop shut down...)

Well, my initial reaction was that if they were shutting down "illegal" sex shops, then perhaps there was an increased police presence/change in policing policies in those areas anyway, which could impact robberty statistics?